You are here

Blog

Business Continuity and Agile Working

This is a guest blog from Wisework Associate, Graham Ramsey. It covers a topic that is highly relevant to today's world of agile working. Contact can be made with him at Graham.Ramsey@Rabcoms.co.uk, www.rabcoms.co.uk, +44 (0) 7867 900479 .

Partners and Associates

We are hearing more and more about the ‘Gig Economy’ and the rise of the self-employed. We are also seeing many traditional businesses slim down and rely on a ‘Contingent Workforce’ that they can call on when needed. This has resulted in a growth of networked organisations where people get together to provide work for a customer but are not employed in conventional jobs.

Why are we all stressed out?

Stress has been described as the ‘Health Epidemic of the 21st Century’ by the World Health Organization and its effect on our emotional and physical health can be devastating. In a recent USA study, over 50% of individuals felt that stress negatively impacted work productivity. According to a CIPD survey in the UK, 38% of employees are under excessive pressure at least once a week and almost a third say they come home exhausted either often or always.

Taylor Review on Good Work makes sense

It’s good to see that the Taylor Review has taken a sensible view of the way work is evolving and is proposing that legislation should catch up with what is now happening in the real world. We have seen a rapid growth in non-standard working patterns and the introduction of ‘gig working’ using platforms such as Uber. This has resulted in confusion about the status of workers.

Blurring boundaries between home and work

A detailed report, "Working anytime, anywhere: The effects on the world of work" has recently been published jointly by Eurofound and the ILO. It studies home-based and mobile workers ten European countries and five others.

More men working part-time

The Institute for Fiscal Studies has just issued a report stating that men on low pay are four times more likely to be working part-time than in the 1990s.  It shows that 1 in 5 men aged from 25 to 55 in low paid jobs are now working part-time.  Twenty years ago it was 1 in 20.

Gender pay gap and flexible working

There has been extensive publicity recently about the gap between pay for women and men, triggered by an IFS report showing that, on average, women earn 18% less per hour than men. However, this gap between men's and women's hourly pay rates has been closing in recent decades - it was 23% in 2003 and 28% in 1993.

Agile working and personality tests

Ever since the dawn of the Teleworking Era, people have been looking for the ideal tool to match personality with flexible working. In the 1980's, when working remotely with technology started to expand, there were small studies attempting to use existing tools like Myers-Briggs (MBTI) to analyse home workers. None of these could come to any useful conclusion.

Improving productivity

The subject of productivity has been in the news recently.  The government is trying to improve the UKs ranking against other countries and struggling to work out how to do it.

Having a flexible labour market should help but it hasn’t worked too well so far.  This could be because managers still don’t know how to transform agile working from an employee benefit into a business strategy. Moving from a low skill, low wage economy to the opposite certainly sounds like a smart idea. But how can it be done? 

Do we really need amended Flexible Working Regulations?

How to ensure the whole organisation benefits from flexible working and the response to changes in the legislation are not just piecemeal.

Pages

Subscribe to <none>